Looking Back on May 21, 2017

Last week’s History Mystery photo, above, was from the same collection of negatives as last week’s photograph of the train wreck near Rowena. The photographs are credited to Al Sutton.
Jerry Phillips wrote that Al Sutton lived on East Tenth Street in The Dalles.  He was a machinist at The Dalles Cooperative Growers  He designed and built a lot of the early cherry processing equipment with Lee Moon, the foreman. “I believe Al was also an amateur photographer, which could explain the envelope with photos,” Sutton said.
Phillips wrote of the photo above, the subject “is a building adjacent to the depot of the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company, The Dalles and Wasco Co. Fruit and Grain Exhibit, where the Business Men's Association had a display of crops grown in the area.  
“Every variety of deciduous fruit, either in the natural state or preserved in some manner — grains, hay, vegetables and nuts — were included in the displays. “This was a promotion to get investors and farmers interested in moving to the area,” he explained.  “From the sign it appears this photo was taken in 1920, but I can't identify the men.”  
The building was in close proximity to the train depot, where passengers embarked and disembarked from the passenger trains, noted Terry Harmon. It was located where the parking area of The Dalles Post Office is located.


Last week’s History Mystery photo, above, was from the same collection of negatives as last week’s photograph of the train wreck near Rowena. The photographs are credited to Al Sutton. Jerry Phillips wrote that Al Sutton lived on East Tenth Street in The Dalles. He was a machinist at The Dalles Cooperative Growers He designed and built a lot of the early cherry processing equipment with Lee Moon, the foreman. “I believe Al was also an amateur photographer, which could explain the envelope with photos,” Sutton said. Phillips wrote of the photo above, the subject “is a building adjacent to the depot of the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company, The Dalles and Wasco Co. Fruit and Grain Exhibit, where the Business Men's Association had a display of crops grown in the area. “Every variety of deciduous fruit, either in the natural state or preserved in some manner — grains, hay, vegetables and nuts — were included in the displays. “This was a promotion to get investors and farmers interested in moving to the area,” he explained. “From the sign it appears this photo was taken in 1920, but I can't identify the men.” The building was in close proximity to the train depot, where passengers embarked and disembarked from the passenger trains, noted Terry Harmon. It was located where the parking area of The Dalles Post Office is located.

photo

Terray Harmon, Gary Conley and Lucile A. Stephens all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 2¼- by 3¼-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The horizontal 2¼-inch size suggests the use of a semi-professional film camera. “Ghost images” of two people standing near the closest section of track suggest the use of a tripod. Both Harmon and Conley recognized the location as the Rowena area, just west of where Meyer Park is today, about one mile west of Rowena. The date is clearly before Bonneville Dam was built, judging by the level of the water. The negatives were in an envelope (pictured last week) found inside a larger envelope. Harmon noted that the name on the inner envelope, “A.E. Crosby, The Dalles,” was a local drug store early in the last century. Written on the envelope was “Dr. Griffith. Trains met head on. Date of wreck unknown by A.S.” The small envelop above was inside a larger envelope, that included a number of larger format negatives. That envelope has a note that reads “Al Sutton, 1920,” and another that reads, “To Dr. Griffith — Scenes we’ll see no more found in my stepdads boxes.” At the corner of this larger envelope is a stamp, “Grace Seabloom, 1217 E. Tenths Street, The Dalles.”

20 years ago – 1997

A media preview of the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Wasco County Historical Museum on Tuesday offered an advance look at the facility, which holds its grand opening this Saturday.

Add a wall here, remove a wall there, and voila!, the PUD building will become the domain, by fall 1998, of the city police. The Dalles Police Chief Jay Waterbury estimated fewer than half the office walls in the PUD building would be altered under preliminary redesign plans.

Mark Kenneth Johnson, 28, was indicted early this month on murder and arson charges in the death of his mother. He also faces two counts of first degree arson.

40 years ago – 1977

Effective Monday lawn and garden irrigation hours in The Dalles will be 6 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., and 6:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Penalties from $5 to $25 will be enforced on violations and increased surveillance of watering is scheduled. Since February the city has been on summer water restrictions. That means no watering from noon until 6 p.m. and no watering after dark. It also means no open ended hose watering, no watering of parking strips (grass between the curb and sidewalk) and no washing of cars except on grassy areas where the water used would benefit the grass.

The Dalles Lions Club blood drawing chairman, Jerry Urness, says Lions will provide 20 pints of blood toward a quota of 150 when the next blood drawing is held Tuesday. He said that 47 per cent of the population is eligible to donate blood, however only three per cent does.

The Carter administration is warning again too much optimism regarding word from Geneva of breakthrough in U.S.-Soviet strategic arms limitations talks.

About 1,500 people gathered at East meadow, N.Y. Friday to watch the reenactment of Charles Lindbergh’s historic takeoff for the first transatlantic flight.

60 years ago – 1957

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (UP) – A savage tornado, the worst of the year, roared out of Kansas and into two suburban Kansas City subdivisions Monday night, spreading death and destruction. The twister left at least 35 dead, many of them still unidentified today, and 230 injured.

Out-of-town attendance totaling 225 is indicated in advance registration for the Oregon state convention of Knights of Columbus in The Dalles beginning Friday, J. H. Blissenbach, convention co-chairman with Roman Bertrand, reported this morning.

The annual spring job of placing rock on port dock decking and railroad spur is now being accomplished because of current high water. A chained log boom also has been put into the water around the port facilities to keep driftwood from exerting pressure on the dock and trestle. Columbia river flow at The Dalles is expected to reach 660,000 cubic feet per second today and drop slightly tomorrow.

The Dalles high school has one of the best English departments in the state, Dr. N. H. Oswald, University of Oregon English professor said during a recent visit here.

80 years ago – 1937

At a meeting of the old Fort Dalles Historical society held recently at the Historical building, announcement was made of the winners in the essay contest sponsored by the society. The contest was open to any upper grade school student in Wasco County.

COLUMBIA HEIGHTS, May 21. – Pea growers of this vicinity will begin picking their early varieties early next week, it is reported, although work in the majority of fields will be delayed for approximately another week. Due to the unusually cool spring, the peas are maturing about a month later than usual, according to growers.

ST. JOSEPH, Mo., May 21. (UP) – In full view of a crowd of 3500 that watched an indoor Shrine circus at the auditorium last night, a Sumatran tiger seized and inflicted serious wounds on H. G. Getchell, 81, as he walked by her cage.

100 years ago – 1917

The food survey campaign, which is being conducted in Hood River, Sherman, Gilliam and Morrow counties by the extension department of the Oregon Agricultural college, under the direction of the United States department of agriculture, is progressing rapidly with J. W. Brewer as district agent and H. W. G. Miller as assistant. Owing to the exceedingly heavy rains and the serious railroad accident on the Heppner branch of the O.-W. R. & N. and heavy rains in Gilliam county, returns from districts there are coming in slowly to the officials here. There is a general indication that the farmers realize they are confronted with a food shortage and they are indicating their intention to plant gardens to take care of their own families.

SALEM, Ore., May 121. – Three hundred fifty brand new laws are in effect in Oregon today, thanks to the 1917 session of the state legislature. Measures which did not carry emergency clauses or were not referred to the people went into effect at the stroke of 12 o’clock this morning, or just 90 days after the adjournment of the legislative session.

Berlin Admits Reverse on Western Front: BERLIN, May 21. – The French have succeeded gaining a hold on Mount Cornillet. The British have occupied “completely demolished trenches which were abandoned in accord with our plans,” it was officially stated today.

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Mosier oil train fire

Clips from oil train fire in Mosier, Friday, June 3, 2016. by Mark B. Gibson/The Dalles Chronicle. Enlarge

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