Looking Back on March 12, 2017

Gary Conley contributed to this report. 
Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4- by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. Information on the envelope reads “Whistle (Locomotive) at Laundry and RR men and fans, Jan. 14, 1957.”
The photograph ran in The Dalles Optimist (5 cents a copy) Jan. 17, 1957. The caption reads, “Authentic ‘rails’ and a few train fans gathered Monday for the first blowing of the whistle at Model Laundry — which came from a steam locomotive of the Union Pacific and was donated by the Old Timers club. From left: Don Martin, Bill Gale, engineer and Lay Carlisle, jeweler, who would like to be one; Dr. Thomas Griffith; Robert Ford, brakeman; Tom Carson and Bert DeVaney, retired conductors; Geo Vogel, retired machinist; Wes Rowland, motor car repairman, and Wes Botlemiller, section foreman. Optimist Newsphoto.”
The Model laundry building is located on First Street between Union and Liberty streets.
Gary Conley correctly identified the building, and five of the men in the picture.


Gary Conley contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4- by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. Information on the envelope reads “Whistle (Locomotive) at Laundry and RR men and fans, Jan. 14, 1957.” The photograph ran in The Dalles Optimist (5 cents a copy) Jan. 17, 1957. The caption reads, “Authentic ‘rails’ and a few train fans gathered Monday for the first blowing of the whistle at Model Laundry — which came from a steam locomotive of the Union Pacific and was donated by the Old Timers club. From left: Don Martin, Bill Gale, engineer and Lay Carlisle, jeweler, who would like to be one; Dr. Thomas Griffith; Robert Ford, brakeman; Tom Carson and Bert DeVaney, retired conductors; Geo Vogel, retired machinist; Wes Rowland, motor car repairman, and Wes Botlemiller, section foreman. Optimist Newsphoto.” The Model laundry building is located on First Street between Union and Liberty streets. Gary Conley correctly identified the building, and five of the men in the picture.

photo

Gary Conley, Karl Vercouteran, Terray Harmon, Lucile Stephens and Kevin Lohse all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4- by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. Information on the envelope reads, “Urness Motors, Feb. 9, 1951.”It was taken for The Dalles Optimist. The photograph was taken looking northwest from the corner of Third and Federal streets. The C.H. Urness Motors building is located where The Dalles Chronicle currently has its office, 315 Federal Street. On enlargement, the small building just to the right of the “new cars and trucks” sign is “Harry’s Radio Service.” The gas station on the right is a “Phillips 66” station. The truck parked at the gas station sports several messages, including “Jack Garrett, The Music Box, Phone 2091.” There are also words on the hood, of which “Records” is the only one legible. The crate in the back of the truck is labeled “Wurlitzer Pianos.” Gary Conley noted that in the building across the alley, in the hall upstairs, was the Arcadia Dance Hall.

20 years ago – 1997

A recently-adopted rate schedule that included a change in the facilities fee is still drawing protests from Northern Wasco County PUD customers. The latest concern, about the $20.80 per month facility fee for small commercial users, came from Mike Ward at the last PUD meeting. His concern was over the monthly fee charged for the pump at the fire hall, which is used only to fill the tanks of fire trucks and usually only in the summer. He said the yearly charges for that pump used to be only about $200 a year and with the increased facility fee the cost for electricity works out to about 43 cents a kilowatt. Ward asked the board to reconsider its new rate schedule for small commercial users but did not offer any suggestions on what to do.

The snowpack that becomes the summer water source for The Dalles is still above average in depth and water content. “We’re really happy with the way things look right now,” said Dave Anderson, the city’s water quality manager. “Between what we anticipate right now to be good water supplies, coupled with metering, we don’t anticipate (water) restrictions (this summer),” Anderson added.

What’s black and white and has spread all over? The prolific zebra mussel has infested the eastern United States and it’s just a matter of time before it invades Northwest waters, shutting down turbines in federal dams, coating fish screens and ladders and clogging irrigation systems. “All agree, it’s not if they come, but when,” Jim Athearn, a biologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, said at a conference Monday.

40 years ago – 1977

Heck Harper will entertain with guitar music appropriate to St. Patrick’s Day for members of Columbia Chapter of the Blind at the Thursday meeting of the group. Instead of the usual meeting time, members are to meet at 7:30 p.m. at the Wasco Electric Building.

DETROIT (UPI) – About 6,500 employes at a key General Motors Corp. assembly plant in Wisconsin walked off their jobs early today, joining 1,200 GM workers in Ohio in strikes over local contract issues. The plant is a key manufacturer of Chevrolet Impalas and Caprices and GMC and Chevy pickup trucks.

Heavy snow warnings were up today for the Cascades and Siskiyous as cold air followed a storm front into Oregon. Up to a foot of new snow was forecast. There was a high avalanche hazard on Mt. Hood above 5,000 feet but the weather man said the hazard should reduce or end late today. The snowfall level was expected to drop to 1,000 feet with 2 to 4 inches forecast for the coastal mountain passes.

60 years ago – 1957

Govs. Albert Rosellini of Washington and Robert Holmes of Oregon will be on hand for the opening of navigation lock at The Dalles dam this coming Sunday afternoon but because of pressure of work both men have declined participating in events scheduled Saturday.

By UNITED PRESS – Influenza in epidemic proportion has struck the University of Idaho and schools at Clarkston, Wash., and Lewiston.

BOSTON (UP) – The world of science and adventure today mourned the passing of Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd, who unlocked the frozen secrets of Antarctica in five famed explorations that covered a record two million miles. His family and his physician, Dr. William E. Greer, were at the bedside when death came “peacefully in sleep” at 6:20 p.m. EST to the man who excited the world with his exploits in exploration and naval aviation. It was barely three weeks ago that Byrd, the first person ever to fly over North and South Poles, received the last of his many decorations. He was presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom, accompanied by a personal note from President Eisenhower, in recognition of his distinguished scientific contributions to the nation.

80 years ago – 1937

Advocates of free ferry service at The Dalles and other points along the Columbia river were heartened today by a step in the desired direction taken by the Washington legislature, which approved a bill providing for state-operated ferries between Astoria and Megler and at Maryhill.

Union Pacific Stages, Inc., has made application to the city for permission to load and unload bus passengers at Third and Court streets in front of the Commodore apartment building, indicating intention to move the present bus terminal from its present location in front of the Bank hotel. City Recorder J. H. Steers said members of the city council have not yet had the opportunity to give formal approval to the stage company’s application, but that it was his understanding that councilmen favored the move. Moving the terminal from the Bank hotel location would relieve considerable traffic congestion on Second street, the city’s main business thoroughfare and through highway route.

SAN FRANCISCO, March 12. (UP) – One ship was afire and another aground far out on the Pacific today according to radio reports received here. The British motorship Silver March reported fires in its holds for the second time and requested nearby vessels to keep in constant communication. It gave its location as 900 miles northeast of Honolulu. The radio reports indicated the crew believed they would be able to keep the flames under control and that immediate aid was not needed. The Chinese steamer Hopsang was reported aground at the southern end of Formosa.

100 years ago – 1917

Lee Bolton of this city narrowly escaped serious, if not fatal, injury, this morning when his automobile went over the edge of the “brewery” grade and ran down the hill, over large rocks, finally stopping when it hit a large tree. Mr. Bolton was coming down the grade and attempted to turn into the Seufert road. Another machine was coming up the road and Mr. Bolton stopped his car. When he again started he failed to turn quick enough and his car went off the grade, making a sheer drop of about 10 feet and bumped over rocks down a steep incline.

The Ruthton hill section of the Columbia river highway will be rushed to completion, says a dispatch from Hood River. The county court ordered this section of the road viewed by the county road viewers, and an early report will be made. The sum of approximately $50,000 will be available from the state and government for the completion of the grading of the three miles of road from the Mitchell Point tunnel to the top of Ruthton hill.

WASHINGTON, March 12. – It was learned today another group of food-price manipulators in New York state will be indicted shortly. Attorney General Gregory conferred today with special food investigators.

Birthday cards. Judd’s book store.

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Mosier oil train fire

Clips from oil train fire in Mosier, Friday, June 3, 2016. by Mark B. Gibson/The Dalles Chronicle. Enlarge

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