Looking Back on March 5, 2017

Gary Conley, Karl Vercouteran, Terray Harmon, Lucile Stephens and Kevin Lohse all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4- by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. Information on the envelope reads, “Urness Motors, Feb. 9, 1951.”It was taken for The Dalles Optimist. The photograph was taken looking northwest from the corner of Third and Federal streets. The C.H. Urness Motors building is located where The Dalles Chronicle currently has its office, 315 Federal Street.  On enlargement, the small building just to the right of the “new cars and trucks” sign is “Harry’s Radio Service.” The gas station on the right is a “Phillips 66” station. The truck parked at the gas station sports several messages, including “Jack Garrett, The Music Box, Phone 2091.” There are also words on the hood, of which “Records” is the only one legible. The crate in the back of the truck is labeled “Wurlitzer Pianos.” Gary Conley noted that in the building across the alley, in the hall upstairs, was the Arcadia Dance Hall.


Gary Conley, Karl Vercouteran, Terray Harmon, Lucile Stephens and Kevin Lohse all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4- by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. Information on the envelope reads, “Urness Motors, Feb. 9, 1951.”It was taken for The Dalles Optimist. The photograph was taken looking northwest from the corner of Third and Federal streets. The C.H. Urness Motors building is located where The Dalles Chronicle currently has its office, 315 Federal Street. On enlargement, the small building just to the right of the “new cars and trucks” sign is “Harry’s Radio Service.” The gas station on the right is a “Phillips 66” station. The truck parked at the gas station sports several messages, including “Jack Garrett, The Music Box, Phone 2091.” There are also words on the hood, of which “Records” is the only one legible. The crate in the back of the truck is labeled “Wurlitzer Pianos.” Gary Conley noted that in the building across the alley, in the hall upstairs, was the Arcadia Dance Hall.

photo

No one responded to identify last week’s History Mystery, which is from the Wilma Roberts collection and has no caption information. As can be seen in the photograph, this is a picture of “The Great Northern Furniture Store.” Near the peak of the roof is the date, 1898, and the nameplate below that reads “W.A. Johnston & Co.” The store is referenced in the April 23, 1898 edition of The Dalles Times-Mountaineer under the headlines, “WAR ON HIGH PRICE, The Great Northern Furniture Store Drove Him Out.” “Old ‘High Price’ held sway in The Dalles for a long time, but he has been vanquished. His captor was the Great Northern Furniture store, and it won a great victory. Under old high price, you paid $65 to $150 for a bedroom suite; now you get it at the Great Northern for from $15 to $50, and the reduction on all other goods has been great. Another beautiful feature of the Great Northern’s victory is that it supplies the customer with anything wanted to furnish the house. There you can get anything needed for the parlor, bedroom, kitchen or pantry. It is a perfect department store in its line, where the widest range of stock may be found to select from.”

20 years ago – 1997

Rachele Stumpf, sophomore at The Dalles High School, wears many hats in the drama department’s production, “Joseph And the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.” Stumpf is heavily involved in the play on several fronts – speaking the part of narrator on two nights of the production, dancing and singing as a member of the chorus the rest of the nights, and working as costume coordinator, designer and seamstress in her spare time. And spare time is indeed spare for Stumpf, who’s also a violinist and member of the school choir.

Calling it a “work in progress,” The Dalles School District released the latest version of the site plan for development at Columbia View Heights. The arrow-shaped, 100-acre property is the proposed site of a new middle school. The district is asking voters to approve a $21.5 million bond measure to build the school, as well as to make improvements at existing schools. “The latest version addresses some of the logistical concerns Columbia View Heights neighbors raised regarding traffic,” explained Ann-Gale Peterson, school board member.

40 years ago – 1977

Three women and a man were killed in a headon collision near Rowena last night. Oregon State Police said the man was headed west in the eastbound lanes. The deaths brought the toll in Wasco County to six for the year and was one of the worst accidents in the county in recent years. Another quadruple fatality occurred just inside the Wasco County line on US 97 in 1975. Both vehicles were removed from the scene by the B&B Towing and the bodies of the victims were taken to Smith Callaway Chapel.

Brazil announced another price increase and more taxes on all forms of exported coffee Friday, a move that could drive up prices once again for the American consumer. Brazil pegged its minimum price hikes at more than 25 per cent.

WASHINGTON (UPI) – The rugged winter sent unemployment last month up to 7.5 per cent and “distorted” U.S. economic trends, but officials say the economic recovery remains on course.

WASHINGTON (UPI) – A brief notation in a government report this week showed farmers have reached a milestone most would rather have seen delayed. The Agriculture Department’s index of farm costs for the month ending Feb. 15 reached 200. Since the index base of 100 represents average costs during 1967, the figure means farm costs have doubled in the past decade. In contrast, the January Consumer Price Index covering all food and non-food commodities bought by consumers was 175.3, or 75 per cent about 1967.

60 years ago – 1957

Feasibility of wood pulp production in the Mid-Columbia area between Cascade Locks and The Dalles is the topic of an engineering study recently completed at direction of Oregon Development commission, members of The Dalles Chamber of Commerce board of directors were informed at their luncheon meeting yesterday.

Celilo Falls will be completely covered by The Dalles dam reservoir Sunday, March 10, and on the same day the first water will flow over the spillway at the dam, project Resident Engineer H. B. Elder reports. Earlier planning by the Corps of Engineers had indicated that The Dalles dam would be closed Saturday, March 9, but flow of the Columbia river and coordination of releases at McNary and Bonneville projects have bought about a revision of previous closure plans. Elder yesterday said it is still too early to say exactly at what hour Sunday water will start coming over the spillway but that it is expected to be late Sunday afternoon.

A rock on the Columbia River highway about 10 miles west of Hood River was blamed for a one-car accident resulting in the hospitalization of Mrs. Elizabeth Waters, of near Parkdale, last night. State police reported that the left front wheel of the car driven by Mrs. Walters struck a rock on the highway and nearly swerved in front of an oncoming truck and trailer. Mrs. Walters reportedly suffered a rib injury in the accident.

80 years ago – 1937

TYGH RIDGE, March 4. – Mr. and Mrs. Ned Underhill were surprised Tuesday evening with a five-hundred party, seven tables being in play.

The regular March meeting of the high school Parent-Teachers’ association was held last night at the high school when a short program was enjoyed following the business meeting.

An inter-communication system allowing contact to be made between various parts of Port of The Dalles terminal No. 1 is being installed, the office of Port Manager Charles L. Nellor reported today.

SALEM, Ore., March 5. (UP) – The bill to give the upper Columbia river representation on the state pilot commission went down to defeat in the senate today, 21-8 for indefinite postponement. “The port of The Dalles is not a port,” said Senator Franciscovich. “Its dock is still on dry land and there will not be any ships coming to it for at least another two years. It would be extremely unwise for us to expand the commission in the strength of the totally unknown quantity of the importance of the Port of The Dalles.”

Squeezing the water out of flood-soaked bills was just so much dry routine to L. S. Monroe, money department manager, as he ran through an ordinary laundry mangle some of the Louisville Federal Reserve Bank’s currency of various denominations. The bills were soaked by the Ohio river which covered most of the city.

100 years ago – 1917

Notice. – There will be an election on the second Monday in march, the twelfth, for the purpose of electing a fire chief and assistant, to be held at the city fire hall from 5 to 7 in the evening. By order of the fire delegates.

WASHINGTON, March 5. – President Wilson wants quick action by the United States senate to change the rules and permit rapid passage of “an armed neutrality” measure when he calls an extra session of congress to reintroduce the bill. Admitting that his hands are tied by ancient statutes which forbid him arming merchant vessels and taking other means of protecting American rights the president is relying on the senate to act and “save the country from disaster.” In bitter excoriation of “the little group of willful men, representing no opinion but their own,” who filibustered the neutrality bill to death, the president has declared “the great government of the United States is in a helpless and contemptible position before the world.”

Though sanctioned by international law and American precedent, the administration hesitated to adopt the armed-merchantmen measure, and finally advocated it as a last resort. It is intolerable that American shipping should be blockaded in our harbors by the arbitrary fiat of a Central-European emperor.

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Mosier oil train fire

Clips from oil train fire in Mosier, Friday, June 3, 2016. by Mark B. Gibson/The Dalles Chronicle. Enlarge

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